Steel beam install

The basement where my woodshop lives is a very nice space, but the original wood frame construction consisted of a main floor beam made up of multiple 2 x 10 lumber, supported at approximately 7 foot intervals by jack posts. This made handling long boards and sheet stock very cumbersome. A steel beam is what this basement needed. Installing a single beam to span the 29 feet would have been virtually impossible, so two sections of 8 inch I-beam were used, supported by a single 4″ x 4″ HSS post in the middle. I hired an engineer to spec the details, but I was keen to tackle this project, with a little help from some friends.

The problem with replacing a beam is you have to support the floor very well before you start removing the beam. I rented aluminum beams, and jack posts and created two temporary beams on either side of the original 2x 10 wooden beam.

The problem with replacing a beam is you have to support the floor very well before you start removing anything. I rented aluminum beams, and jack posts and created two temporary beams on either side of the original 2x 10 wooden beam. Kevin helped rig the temporary supports.

 

After supporting the floor, the old beam was cut out and removed in 4 foot sections.

After supporting the floor, the old beam was cut out and removed in 4 foot sections.

A remaining section of the wood beam is seen in the right hand of the frame, and the temporary supports to the right and left.

A remaining section of the wood beam is seen in the right hand of the frame, and the temporary supports to the right and left.

Ross MIG welds the sections of 8" I-beam together in the middle.

Ross MIG welds the sections of 8" I-beam together in the middle. Each 14.5 foot section of I-beam weighed about 400 pounds, a comfortable lift for 8 tall guys.

The base plate detail where the 4 x 4 post meets the floor, and original footing pad. The 1/2 inch steel pad was levelled in high strength concrete, and held in place by 5/8" expansion bolts.

The base plate detail where the 4 x 4 post meets the floor, and original footing pad. The 1/2 inch steel pad was levelled in high strength concrete, and held in place by 5/8" expansion bolts.

 

Top plate detail after welding.

Top plate detail after welding.

Beam pocket detail where the I-beam rests on the foundation. The 5/8" pad was also levelled in high strength concrete.

Beam pocket detail where the I-beam rests on the foundation. The 5/8" pad was also levelled in high strength concrete. This support idea was suggested by Architect and builder Emanuel Jannasch.

Basement before steel beam installation.

Basement before steel beam installation.

Basement after steel beam installation. From 3 posts to only one. What a difference it makes to useable space.

Basement after steel beam installation. From three posts to only one. What a difference it makes to useable space.

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