Banister project

This project required the off-site construction of approximately 60 feet of custom cedar and pine banisters and posts. The components then had to be transportsed to a distant location. The style of this 1930’s cottage called for banisters that matched the original feeling and scale of the previous installation. The original posts were made from 6×6 solid pine and cedar timber. This is difficult and expensive to source in this day and age. I decided to make “square tubes” from 1 x 6 cedar, and clamp and glue the edges with exterior polyurethane glue. The effect is a more stable post, that should stand the test of time.

The old banisters featuring the 15 foot long section.

The old banisters featuring a 15 foot long section.

 

Old banister section with original solid 6x 6 post.

Old banister section with original solid 6x6 post.

The new cedar posts after assembly being painted.

The new cedar posts after assembly being painted.

Various new banister components ready for packing.

Various new banister components in the shop ready for packing.

The set of new banister components wrapped in cardboard and plastic wrap, ready for transport.

The set of new banister components wrapped in cardboard and plastic wrap, ready for transport.

Banister components after unwrapping. No paint damage at all.

Banister components after unwrapping. No paint damage at all.

Post and top cap detail. All components are attached to each other and the stair structure by stainless steel screws. Since the stair treads will require replacement long before the banisters, removeal and re-installation of the banisters will be much easier. Top cap featyres a routered drip edge to keep water from seeping inside the posts.

Post and top cap detail. All components are attached to each other and the stair structure by stainless steel screws. Since the stair treads will require replacement long before the banisters, removeal and re-installation of the banisters will be much easier. Top cap features a routered drip edge to keep water from seeping inside the posts.

The final installation. It took two people, one day to install the new banisters. Construction and finishing took about two weeks. All components were custom milled, and shaped to prevent water from collecting. The 15 foot long railing components had to be made from 2 eight foot pices of wood, and are held together by 10 inch scarf jointsthat are doweled and glued with marine epoxy.

The final installation. It took two people, one day to install the new banisters. Construction and finishing took about two weeks. All components were custom milled, and shaped to prevent water from collecting. The 15 foot long railing components had to be made from 2 eight foot pieces of wood, and are held together by 10 inch scarf joints that are doweled and glued with marine epoxy.

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